The World As I See It (Google eBook)

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Citadel Press, Apr 25, 2006 - Literary Collections - 125 pages
74 Reviews
A selection of short pieces written by Einstein during the period between 1922 and 1934. Each piece shares the great thinker's views on life, government, economics, disarmament, war and Judaism in a collection that becomes all the more remarkable for its hindsight view of casual thoughts that history has proven to be prophecies - and all the more unique for displaying the author of those prophecies as a deeply rounded, warm human being. Genius affirmed, demystified and validated.
  

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Review: The World As I See It

User Review  - Nazish Islam - Goodreads

In spite of a physicist and rational man, the theory and views of Einstein towards world, religion, fellowmen, war, peace and West was Impressive. I'm doing mass communication and this piece of ... Read full review

Review: The World As I See It

User Review  - Sherif - Goodreads

An Interesting view of a man who is mostly known for his scientific achievements and rarely for his efforts and hopes for international peace. But this is not, in a sense, a book written by Albert ... Read full review

Contents

The World As I See
3
Good and Evil
9
In Honour of Arnold Berliners
16
Congratulations to Dr Solf
22
The Religiousness of Science
31
Interviewers
34
Some Notes on My American Impressions
40
Politics and Pacifism
47
The Disarmament Conference of 1932
68
Another Ditto
74
Thoughts on the World Economic Crisis
76
Production and Purchasing Power
82
Manifesto
91
A Reply
99
Jewish YouthAn Answer to a Questionnaire
105
The Jewish Community
114

Compulsory Service
54
A Farewell
60
AntiSemitism and Academic Youth
120
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century, was born in Ulm, Germany, to German-Jewish parents. He published his first great theories in Switzerland in the early 1900s while working as a patent clerk.

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